PSA

23 June 2017 02:35 pm
lost_spook: (Default)
[personal profile] lost_spook
I'm still tired from yesterday, but a head's up (via a genealogy news feed I follow) in case it's of any use to other people:

Find My Past (one of the big online genealogy sites for the UK) are allowing free access to their main UK collections till 26th June. (No strings attached for this one, not even fake-orders to get it; only registering if you haven't already.)

Some more details & instructions on the site's blog: https://blog.findmypast.com/free-british-irish-records-2445715211.html


*skuttles off to collapse somewhere again*

Links

23 June 2017 01:10 pm
selenak: (rootbeer)
[personal profile] selenak
Confessions of a Trekker: I really don't like ST VI - The Undiscovered Country. Which is, I've discovered, something of a minority opinion, for at least the vocal part of fandom holds this last cinematic outing of the TOS crew in a fond light. However, now and then the dissent becomes vocal, too, as in this rewatch post about the movie in question .


In more fun Trek news, check out this vid about everyone's favourite Cardassian tailor-plus-spy:

Dedicated Follower of Fashion

(Every now and then I wish the movies instead of going for the nth version of Wrath of Khan (with or without a villain called Khan) would tackle the Cardassians instead. And then I conclude the movies would probably mishandle the Cardassians as badly as they did the Romulans, and am glad the Cardassians so far have been reserved for tv.)

And lastly, a BSG fanfic rec:

Rippling Light: tender and heartbreaking take on the friendship of Felix Gaeta and Anastasia Dualla, two characters for whom the phrase "they deserved better" might have been invented.
shadowkat: (Default)
[personal profile] shadowkat
Finally saw the latest Doctor Who which once again cut off the last two minutes. Dang it. That was the best part of the entire episode.

However, Doctor Who, Episode 10, Eater of the Light by Scottish playwrite and tele-writer Rona Munro, who also wrote the Doctor Who episode Survival in 1989, and is among the few female writers of the series, was actually among the better episodes to date.

I am, however, wondering why all the soliders in these episodes are dressed in red, and all the monsters seem to lizards or fish. (Yes, I know Roman soliders tended to wear red...but, not always, and why these soliders?) Maybe that's just me? Maybe it is coincidence? There were a few that weren't, not many, but a few. Maybe...there's some sort of metaphor relating to ancient Rome and the Scots that I'm missing because I don't remember the history that well? (I vaguely remember visiting Hadrian's Wall in the 1980s, and hearing the tale about how the Scots built it and kept the Romans back. Rome was able to conquer everyone but Scotland, in part due to the wall, in part due to the cold.)

There also seems to be an on-going theme about shutting out the light. Along with the agency/choice theme.

Not overly sure the episodic nature of this season works. With just snippets of an overall arc.

This was a metaphor heavy episode, as opposed to plot heavy, which I think worked better. Had a sort of fairy tale structure to it. Also worked better from a structural perspective. I actually prefer Doctor Who when it follows a more dark fairy tale style than sci-fi style. Mainly because I'm not sure these writers are very adept at sci-fi.
Am wondering if it is possible to do an episode without a monster of the week?

Eh, spoilers )

Dept. of Jump!

22 June 2017 05:28 pm
kaffyr: Cylon Hybrid leaps into future. (Jump!)
[personal profile] kaffyr
So. This Happened.Surprise! )
kaffyr: She's at a typewriter; is she legal? (Are Girls Legal?)
[personal profile] kaffyr
For A Start

[personal profile] lydy  is brilliant. She is a bit of a force of nature, one I would like to see more of, learn more about, and in general have more a part of my world. I still treasure a night many, many years ago, in the "secret" consuite at Minicon, when I had the benefit of her humor and intellect. 

I think I agree with her on things cultural, political, emotional and intellectual at least 80 percent of the time. The other 20 percent of the time? I suspect that we'd probably have some interesting discussions. 

She has written an essay that I believe is well worth reading and thinking about, concerning how women, the world, and "the rules" - for every single value and power of "the rules" that might exist in this universe - intersect. It is her answer, or at least an excellent precis of her answer (because her real answer is the way she approaches the world every day), to the question many men ask (in which the asking is too often more complaint about having their privilege questioned than actual question) of women: "How can I interact with you women without being a douche, if you won't tell me the rules?"

I think I agree about 95 percent with this one. And even if I didn't agree with it nearly that much, it's still an excellent starting place for conversations, or indeed for an internal dialogue, if one were inclined to think about it. Because, as I said, 
[personal profile] lydy  is brilliant, and brilliance nearly always is an excellent light by which to make one's way in this world. And, as she said to me when I asked if I could link, she wants to start conversations.

Shoppings happened

22 June 2017 08:46 pm
beccaelizabeth: my Watcher tattoo in blue, plus Be in red Buffy style font (Default)
[personal profile] beccaelizabeth
Dancing did not happened. I cancelled it because I had forgotten how horrible it is to move around in this weather, and then spent all day moving around in this weather.

New shelves are functioning correctly and filling nicely. Comic boxes are in their new home and plenty of space above for the magazines, as soon as I rearrange the house enough I can get at the magazines.

I figured dancing would be either indoors in the hot humid nastiness or outside on the irregular surface under grey skies with possibility of rain and, earlier, thunder. So I did not go. And next week I won't be going because Norfolk Show means all of Norfolk trying to get through one roundabout about when I'd need to go round it. And neither of these decisions please me, but they're the right ones. probably. but boo.

Shopping worked pretty good. I got a new plate to be for serving foods on, but got it in ordinary plate size and not their serving platter. I'm not sure that one would fit in the sink, let alone the washer. I also bought a tower fan, which I suspect is Too Much Fan, but okays, I have it now. It makes a variety of weird noises and the timer continues to make noise after you've unplugged it, so seems like that bit is clockworks or something, That or it's about to blow up, guess I'll find out.

Foods also worked, everything in its place, and there were two brands of non dairy ice cream with two or possibly even more flavours each! I bought the sort I've tried before in chocolate and vanilla. If I eat it all I can try the alpro. But obviously that will take a while.

... it better take at least two weeks cause I'm shopping more local next week. Means I'll miss picking up my apple thing. Boo.

My day was only exciting if you appreciate good shelving and alphabetisation, but I do, so, :-)
watervole: (Default)
[personal profile] watervole
 Watched a programme on Japan today and googled Hokusai afterwards.

Remember all those tentacle sex fan porn stories?  (Harry Potter fandom in particular has it's share)

Nothing new!

Hokusai's print "Dream of the Fisherman's Wife' is below the cut....  (If I've worked out correctly how to do a cut.  It's been a long time since I used one)

Read more... )

new comics comm!

22 June 2017 09:29 am
snickfic: (Default)
[personal profile] snickfic
[community profile] comicsroundtable is a new comics discussion comm! I haven't poked around much yet, but if you're at all interested in talking comics (emphasis on new ones at the moment, though I'm hoping they'll expand), check it out!

American Gods 1.08

22 June 2017 01:42 pm
selenak: (Illyria by Kathyh)
[personal profile] selenak
Getting this done before the Munich Film Festival starts tomorrow (guests of honor: Bryan Cranston and Sofia Coppola, who brings her parents along!).

Now that the season is over, I'm still not sure whether Fuller's decision to stretch the main plot out and pace it the way he does is justified. I mean, we STILL haven't reached the House on the Rock yet, and I assumed that would happen in the third episode, as it's this story's Council of Elrond scene, so to speak. Just think of a LotR tv adaption where they've barely made out of the Shire by the time the season finishes. Otoh, all that Fuller & Co. have added does enrich the story and I wouldn't have wanted to miss it, so.

And the moral of the story is... )

(no subject)

22 June 2017 12:07 pm
beccaelizabeth: my Watcher tattoo in blue, plus Be in red Buffy style font (Default)
[personal profile] beccaelizabeth
today so far i had to talk to two humans, which is tricky
well three if you count phoning my mum, and four if you count picking up the phone to office noise and a voice I couldn't make out, but two in person.

the shelf thing is resolved by getting extra shelves, and his assurance the shelf going dadunk dadunk will work out fine (and my realising I could just not use that shelf and continue to stack the boxes if it don't work out fine).

it is Far Too Hot to be doing, and yet I had to do the vacuum cleaning, to sort out the carpet after the deliveries. and also clean the shelves, which are a bit dusty. and then judging the height turned into putting books on, which only was Jones because I can't find Kay until I put the Analog collection back. but it is far too hot, so I'm sweating and trying to drink steadily.

If I put enough books in order I can put my chair back in its rightful place, and also get at the other computer again.

but if I wait until later it must get cooler eventually. and I'm planning to buy a fan. if Sainsburys still has them after all this.

More Links Than A Bag Of Sausages

22 June 2017 03:11 am
petzipellepingo: (more links by eyesthatslay)
[personal profile] petzipellepingo
SlayAlive talks to Corinna Bechko about AtS Season Eleven, Issue No. Five .

PopCultureRollCall podcast talks Becoming, Part Two .

Can't win

21 June 2017 10:06 pm
killiara: (Sephiroth)
[personal profile] killiara
I need to sleep off this migraine. It's at a low enough level, a cup of highly caffinated tea should shut it up long enough for me to actually sleep.

*drink tea*

Now I'm too awake to sleep! But... at least I don't hurt beyond tolerable levels?

Wed Reading Meme

21 June 2017 07:39 pm
shadowkat: (work/reading)
[personal profile] shadowkat
1. What I just finished reading?

[As an aside, someone on Good Reads tried to quiz me on a romance novel that I reviewed in 2013. Seriously you think I'm going to remember the details of a romance novel I read back in 2013? I'm lucky if I can remember reading it. That's why I write reviews of these books, so I can keep track of the fact that I read them and don't accidentally by them again or re-read. My mother and I joke about this, neither of us can remember the book six months after we read it. It's actually part of the appeal. Romance novels are really hard to remember...they are so interchangeable and the writing style tends for the most part to be rather non-distinct. I actually like reading them for that reason at times...it's a nice light story, resolved by love, and caring, little to no violence, lots of sex (well sometimes depends), and I can delete from the memory banks. Got too much to remember as it is.)

Marry in Haste (Marriage for Convenience #1) by Anne Gracie

What works here, is the writer managed to subvert an incredibly annoying romance novel trope, aka the catastrophic misunderstanding, usually caused by the protagonists' stupidity.

The set-up? The heroine was disowned by her father because he believed some vicious rumors about her. Apparently she'd had an affair with a twenty-six year old stable hand when she was just seventeen. So when a neighbor who was after her inheritance found out, he decided to pass a nasty rumor about how she'd slept around with various stable hands and groomsmen, to everyone in town to convince her father to marry her off to him, to save her reputation. The father believed him. She took off to be a school-mistress. And eventually ends up married to our hero as a business arrangement to chaperon his sisters and niece through a season. He's adorable. They fall in love. But never say the words. And both doubt the other's feelings because they are too dense to realize actions matter not silly words. Even though everyone else can obviously tell.

So, of course throughout the entire book, I'm waiting for the hero to find out about the rumors and do the same thing her father did. Believe the vicious rumors and treat her horribly. They'll have a big melodramatic argument. She'll run off. Maybe gets hurt. He realizes he loves her, etc. Thinking, he'll probably find out from a friend or overhear it. (Because that's what always happens in these books or at least most of them.)

But that's not what happened. Instead, surprise surprise ...she tells him. He trusts her, doesn't believe a word of the rumor. Her friends and his family team up to kick the nasty gossip to the curb. And it all plays out the way it should. Zero misunderstandings.

Subverts the trope completely. Yay.

My only quibble about the story is...the author clearly doesn't like confrontations or conflict, because most of that happens off page, as does a lot of family scenes. There's a lot of paraphrasing and summarizing in the book. So I felt it was...rather passive at times.

That said, there is good, light banter. The hero is in a word, adorable. And incredibly kind. Not a jerk. And the heroine is equally adorable and kind. Actually with the exception of maybe two characters, which we barely even see...everyone is rather kind and likable.

Overall, an enjoyable read. It takes place just after the War with Napolean. So pre-Victorian period.

As an aside about historical romance -- weirdly the historical accuracy doesn't bother me the way it does in straight historical novels like Hillary Mantel's Wolf Hall. (Which I haven't been able to get into for various reasons but one of the sticking points is I know she made stuff up for dramatic effect. And people bought it as real. My problem with the more literary or straight historicals is often people read those for history, when they aren't accurate. I just read post on FB by a social friend a while back which stated this problem - Students take Hilary Mantels Tudor Novels As Fact


Guy recalled being out for the day after Mantel won the Booker prize for Wolf Hall in 2009 and returning home to find a stack of requests to write 1,000 words on how historically accurate the book was. He was also invited on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. He declined all the offers.

“It is a novel. It is just silly. When you are in a world of the novel, a world of theatre, you tell a lie to tell the truth.

“Let us get this straight, the genius of Mantel is that she is aiming to summon up ghosts and if you look at some of that dialogue, it is absolutely remarkable.”



But what makes for great drama may not make for good history. And, in fact, “Wolf Hall” has stirred considerable controversy among historians and critics, many of whom have wondered what responsibility novelists who write about the past have toward history.


- How Wolf Hall Will Entertain Millions and Threaten to Distort History in the Process

That's the problem I have always had with straight historical novels in a nutshell. It's not just Mantel, it's basically all of them. They lie to you and it's not always clear how, and a lot of people get their history from fictionalized historical novels, where the writer has done a lot research then embellished and reinterpreted it to make a good story or fit their worldview.

So, I actually prefer genre - mystery, fantasy, sci-fi, romance historical hybrids, because it's pretty clear upfront that none of this is real. The history is not accurate.
The writer probably did a little research but not that much. So it's unlikely any reader will read genre for historical information or quote it.

That said, I have read historical novels and do like the genre on occasion, but prefer it when the characters in the historical are "fictional" and not based on real people.

2. What I'm reading now?

Still reading Let's Develop! by Fred Newman who is a somewhat controversial philosopher, political activist, psychotherapist, and teacher, that developed a new type of therapy -- social group therapy. He got into a bit of trouble with the political left, because while Marxist in some respects - more philosophy than economically, he's not anti-capitalism and supported Mayor Bloomberg's bid for Mayor and Ralph Nader.

Anyhow the latest chapter that I read discusses how therapy is not about problem solving or problem, solution, explanation. And states how too much emphasis has been placed on diagnosis. Or explaining dreams or why people act a certain way. And how this gets in the way of developing as a person and creating. I'm paraphrasing, because to be honest I'm still trying to wrap my brain around it.

The exercise at the end of the chapter is...the next time you hit a huge problem that you can't figure out how to solve or is making you crazy. Don't try to solve it. Write a poem about it instead. So I guess that's a poetry challenge.

Fortune Favors the Wicked by Theresa Romain which is about a blind navel officer and a courtesan who go hunting for treasure. I have no idea which historical period we are in. It feels post Napolean, possibly Victorian. All I know is it is pre-1900s.

Sous Chef - 24 Hours on the Line by Michael Gibney - this is told in second person close, which is not the easiest point of view in the world to read. I find jarring.
He's putting "you" as in the "reader" in the shoes of a Sous Chef. "You have these knives, etc". And it's rather detailed. But the voice and point of view are rough going.
Anthony Bourdain, who had a rather distinctive voice, and made the wise decision of writing in first person, was a lot easier and more entertaining.

At least planes can take off here

21 June 2017 06:37 pm
yourlibrarian: ComicScoobies-kate_angel (BUF-ComicScoobies-kate_angel)
[personal profile] yourlibrarian


1) We had a strange weather burst two days ago. The forecast had said possibility of some evening showers but clearly no bad weather was expected because when we turned on the weather radio they were saying skies were clear. Read more... )

2) NPR's 1A had an interesting chat about diversity and Disney productions, as well as the influence of media on kids.

3) I rather liked this discussion about the gendered history of pockets, although I notice it didn't mention the more recent push to get men out of cargo shorts into something more streamlined. This seems to me to strike at the heart of the issue which is that pressure about appearance has always been heaviest on women and this usually results in extreme, and often dangerous, impracticality when it comes to clothes.

"An 1899 New York Times piece makes the somewhat tongue-in-cheek claim that civilization itself is founded on pockets. "As we become more civilized, we need more pockets," the piece says, "No pocketless people has ever been great since pockets were invented, and the female sex cannot rival us while it is pocketless.""

4) HT to Petzi for pointing to the Television Critic's Awards nominees. I think these are frequently a much better list of nominees than the Emmys. That said, I thought a few choices were pretty odd. Read more... )

5) I posted about blockchains a few days ago and saw this discussion about a new project employing them as a new journalism model.

Network Sale!

21 June 2017 09:33 pm
lost_spook: (pg - lynda)
[personal profile] lost_spook
I am having rl this week; it is rubbish. (Or at least, it was hot and now there is a Thing I have to go to tomorrow; everything will be at least better once the Thing is over and I have recovered, or more or less; it's a multi-part Thing, as so often in life. Stupid Thing.)

And then just now I happened to look and Network are having a 45% sale again!. And guess who still has nearly all her b'day money? Oh, yes, I do. Now I just have to decide what to spend it on, so at least that will be some sort of an antidote.

If you are in R2 or can play R2 discs, you too can snag yourself obscure old British telly! (Mostly ITV, it tends to be other companies that release the BBC stuff.) I have been poking through to see what's on offer from my wishlist (lots! \o/) and can tell you that you can also get Press Gang, Enemy at the Door, Public Eye and Sapphire and Steel at bargainous prices! (Also Manhunt, The Power Game, The Sandbaggers and Mr Palfrey and Undermind and Zodiac). So you should go out and buy them and then write me all the fic, obv.

Anyway, I thought I'd give the heads up and enable my like-minded souls on my flist. ([personal profile] liadtbunny, I am shocked that you did not already tell me this! I rely on you for these things! ;-D)

Notebook - Practicality

21 June 2017 09:52 pm
carisma_sensei: (Twin Peaks→Dale Cooper)
[personal profile] carisma_sensei posting in [community profile] dreamwidthlayouts
Title: Notebook
Credit to: [community profile] inconformista
Base style: Practicality
Type: full layout in CSS
Best resolution: 1024x768 or above
Tested in: Firefox, Google Chrome, IE



Click the thumbnail to preview the layout
Layout is here @ [community profile] inconformista

Reading, Listening, Watching

21 June 2017 08:34 pm
purplecat: Hand Drawn picture of a Toy Cat (Default)
[personal profile] purplecat
Reading: Still Crime and Punishment which should be no surprise. However I had anticipated being further in than Chapter 5 by this point.

Listening: Stuff you Missed in History Class on William Moulton Marston, the creator of Wonder Woman. So far he's invented a lie detector and is investigating women's emotional responses to bondage - suddenly Wonder Woman's lasso takes on a whole new dimension. He appears to have been both a feminist of sorts* and a polygamist. The former of which is, I gather, very evident in the early Wonder Woman comics (particularly his belief that the world would be a better place if run by women) the latter somewhat less so.

Watching: We have discovered Stanger Things. Very reminiscent of E.T. (it opens with a D&D game, is set in the 1980s and much of it is short from a child height viewpoint (a characteristic of E.T. according to B.))

*neither of his partners got suitable credit for their, in some cases considerable, input into his work.
copperbadge: (Default)
[personal profile] copperbadge
I was reading this one at the same time as I was reading Sorting The Beef From The Bull, which was like a natural sciences one-two punch; I would read Sorting while commuting, and Remarkable Creatures in bed at night. 

Remarkable Creatures is the fictionalized story of two real-life people, Mary Anning and Elizabeth Philpot, who were fossil hunters in Lyme Regis in England back when we were just starting to like, figure dinosaurs out. It follows their relationship, and their struggles to be seen as legitimate contributors to the scientific record, for several years.

I didn’t actually know the account was based in real life until after I’d finished reading, which did ameliorate some of my disappointment with the book, because it’s hard to make a climactic narrative out of peoples’ real lives – reality just doesn’t flow as smoothly as fiction. But I won’t lie: I am still pretty disappointed that Elizabeth and Mary didn’t end up together. I thought that was totally where we were heading.

Mind you, the story of their friendship is compelling, and Chevalier did find a way to create rising action within the story, even though as she put it in the afterword, Mary Anning basically did the same thing every day for years, in terms of hunting fossils. 

As an account of fossil hunting, of the religious wrestling that people had to do with the concept of extinction, and of the way women were treated in the era, it’s a really great book. And it’s also a fast read, which I’ve come to expect from Chevalier. And honestly, this is the first book of hers I’ve read where the female leads don’t get married, though this is in part because the real-life Mary and Elizabeth didn’t either. 

But it still feels like Chevalier’s books are always about women settling. It’s the same problem – I know that’s what women have had to do, and I’m sure she does it intentionally at least in part to remind us of that fact. I just want more for these heroines. 

But if you’re interested in paleontology, Do Recommend, it’s a good book. Less frustrating than The Last Runaway, certainly, and the characters feel more compelling, more three-dimensional, than some of those in Girl With A Pearl Earring. 

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Orphan Black 5.02.

21 June 2017 09:52 am
selenak: (Rachel by Naginis)
[personal profile] selenak
Still feeling listless (me, that is, not the series) and waiting for my enthusiasm for the show to come back.

Spoilery comments ensue. )

More Links Than A Bag Of Sausages

21 June 2017 03:00 am
petzipellepingo: (more links by eyesthatslay)
[personal profile] petzipellepingo
Five Times Clothes Made the Man and One Time They Didn't (the I&A mix) , Giles by usedtobeljs.

The Power to Protect II , Willow/Xander by madimpossibledreamer.

Dreamed Oz Again Today by beccaelizabeth.

TVLine reports that BtVS was nominated for a Teen Choice Award : Choice Throwback TV Show (#ChoiceThrowbackTVShow)

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